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Billie Holiday – Strange Fruit

Strange Fruit

What Is It?

The song Strange Fruit by the American Jazz & Swing singer Billie Holiday (Lady Day).

Strange Fruit

Here is how Wikipedia describes this song:

Strange Fruit” is a song written and composed by Lewis Allan and recorded by Billie Holiday in 1939. The lyrics were drawn from a poem by Meeropol published in 1937. The song protests the lynching of Black Americans with lyrics that compare the victims to the fruit of trees. Such lynchings had reached a peak in the Southern United States at the turn of the 20th century, and the great majority of victims were black.[2] The song has been called “a declaration” and “the beginning of the civil rights movement“.[3]

Meeropol set his lyrics to music with his wife and the singer Laura Duncan and performed it as a protest song in New York City venues in the late 1930s, including Madison Square Garden. Holiday’s version was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1978.[4] It was also included in the “Songs of the Century” list of the Recording Industry of America and the National Endowment for the Arts.[5]

In 2002, “Strange Fruit” was selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress[6] as being “culturally, historically or aesthetically significant”.

“Strange Fruit” originated as a poem written by the Jewish-American writer, teacher and songwriter Abel Meeropol, under his pseudonym Lewis Allan, as a protest against lynchings.[8][9][10] In the poem, Meeropol expressed his horror at lynchings, inspired by Lawrence Beitler‘s photograph of the 1930 lynching of Thomas Shipp and Abram Smith in Marion, Indiana.[9]

Meeropol published the poem under the title “Bitter Fruit” in January 1937 in The New York Teacher, a union magazine of the Teachers Union.[11][12] Though Meeropol had asked others (notably Earl Robinson) to set his poems to music, he set “Strange Fruit” to music himself. First performed by Meeropol’s wife and their friends in social contexts,[12] his protest song gained a certain success in and around New York. Meeropol, his wife, and the Black vocalist Laura Duncan performed it at Madison Square Garden.[13]

Here are the descriptions for the videos above:

Provided to YouTube by Universal Music Group

Strange Fruit · Billie Holiday

Lady Sings The Blues

℗ A Verve Label Group Release; ℗ 1956 UMG Recordings, Inc.

Released on: 1956-01-01

Producer, Associated Performer, Clarinet: Tony Scott
Associated Performer, Trumpet: Charlie Shavers
Associated Performer, Saxophone: Paul Quinichette
Associated Performer, Piano: Wynton Kelly
Associated Performer, Electric Guitar: Kenny Burrell
Associated Performer, Double Bass: Aaron Bell
Associated Performer, Drums: Lennie McBrowne
Orchestra: Tony Scott Orchestra
Composer Lyricist: Lewis Allan

Auto-generated by YouTube.

Provided to YouTube by Believe SAS

Strange Fruit · Billie Holliday · The Tony Scott Orchestra · Allan · Allan

Masters of Jazz: Billie Holiday & the Tony Scott Orchestra

℗ PCA Music

Released on: 2001-01-01

Auto-generated by YouTube.

Categories
Miscellaneous

Why Rosa Parks Sat In The Front Of The Bus

Why Rosa Parks Sat In The Front Of The Bus

What Is It?

The YouTube video Why Rosa Parks Sat In The Front Of The Bus by the YouTube channel Tra Rags.

Here is the description for this video:

Proverbs 6:16-19

There are six things that the Lord hates, seven that are an abomination to him: haughty eyes, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, a heart that devises wicked plans, feet that make haste to run to evil, a false witness who breathes out lies, and one who sows discord among brothers.

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Miscellaneous

Can Stereotypes Ever Be Good? – Sheila Marie Orfano And Densho

Can stereotypes ever be good? – Sheila Marie Orfano and Densho

What Is It?

The YouTube video Can Stereotypes Ever Be Good? – Sheila Marie Orfano And Densho by the YouTube channel TED-Ed.

Here is the description for this video:

Explore the model minority stereotype, and discover how it became a label for Asian Americans and is used to enforce racial hierarchies.

In 2007, researchers surveyed 180 teachers to understand if they held stereotypes about their students. The most commonly held opinion was that Asian students were significantly more industrious, intelligent, and gentle. This might seem like a good thing, but treating this stereotype as reality can cause a surprising amount of harm. Sheila Marie Orfano and Densho dig into the model minority myth.

Lesson by Sheila Marie Orfano and Densho, directed by Léon Moh-Cah.

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Miscellaneous

Horror Noire

Horror Noire (2021) – Official Teaser [HD] | A Shudder Original

What Is It?

The 2021 Shudder horror anthology movie Horror Noire.

Shudder Horror Noire Trailer

Here is how Shudder describes this movie:

Experience the next chapter of Black horror in this anthology of terrifying tales. Showcasing Black directors and screenwriters, Horror Noire tells six stories written by Tananarive Due and Steven Barnes, Ezra Claytan Daniels, Victor LaValle, Shernold Edwards and Al Letson; featuring racist vampires, supernatural creatures and Satan his damn self. A SHUDDER ORIGINAL

Cast: Lesley-Ann Brandt, Luke James, Erica Ash, Tone Bell, Tony Todd, Peter Stormare, Lenora Crichlow, Rachel True, Brandon Michael Smyth, Sean Patrick Thomas

Here is how The IMDb describes this movie:

Presents together six horror stories from Black directors and screenwriters in a single film: “Daddy,” “Bride Before You,” “Brand of Evil,” “The Lake,” “Sundown” and “Fugue State”.

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Miscellaneous

Marcus Garvey – Black Moses – Extra History

Marcus Garvey – Black Moses – Extra History

What Is It?

The YouTube video Marcus Garvey – Black Moses – Extra History by the YouTube channel Extra Credits.

Marcus Garvey is an interesting and divisive figure in civil rights history. Influenced by the writings of Booker T Washington, he pushed back against the philosophy of the NAACP and W.E.B. Du Bois. On the one hand, he was a passionate and fierce leader who unified the community and worked to fight injustice. On the other hand, he was a separatist to the core, a philosophy that led to him reaching out to the Ku Klux Klan. And that’s never the best sentence to hear. But love him or hate him, there is no denying that he was extremely influential on figures like Malcolm X.